Waka by Fujiwara no Kiyotada

This waka by Fujiwara no Kiyotada was written upon his exile from Court and vows that he will return to court just as surely as the cranes will return to the clouds.

The art is 20″ W x 16″ H and arrives ready to frame. Comes with acid-free foam core backing. This is a mixed media work using watercolor, sumi ink, Western and Japanese papers.

$185.00 $125.00

In stock

Fujiwara no Kiyotada (藤原清正, died July 958) is one of the 36 immortal poets.

This poem uses hentaigana as was the practice in the Heian Period.

天津可勢
婦気井乃裏尓
ゐる多川野
奈と可久毛井尓
加遍ら左類へき

amatsu kaze
fukei no ura ni
iru tadzu no
nado ka kumoi ni
kaerazaru beki

Heavenly winds,
blow on the shore of Fukei,
Like the gathered cranes
will return to the sky,
I too will return to court.

In modern Japanese, this might be written:

天つ風
吹飯の浦に
いる鶴の
などか雲居に
帰らざるべき

For more information see Shinkokinshu: New Collection of Poems Ancient and Modern by Laurel Rasplica Rodd page 713.

heavenly winds blow
on the bay of Fukei
where the cranes gather
why should they not return to
their splendid home in the clouds

Kiyotada had left the capital in the First Month of 956 to take up the post of governor of Kii Province. This poem praising the emperor and expressing his desire to return led to his being recalled to the capital in the Tenth Month of the same year. Fukei Bay in Kii Province (Wakayama Prefecture) was also known as Fukiage (‘blowing upward’). The first two syllables of the place name, fuke, also mean ‘blow!’ and function as a kakekotoba. Kumowi (seat of the clouds) is a common metaphor for the imperial court.

意味: 天の風の吹く吹飯の浦に下りている鶴が、空に舞い戻るように、どうしてもう一度昇殿せずにすまそうか。きっと宮中の殿上に帰る事が許されるであろう。

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