Fine Japanese Calligraphy by Master Japanese Calligrapher Eri Takase


Fine Japanese Calligraphy
The Art of Master Japanese Calligrapher Eri Takase


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The Art of Japanese Haiku
by Master Japanese Calligrapher Eri Takase

Haiku Design By Eri Takase
At Takase Studios we offer beautiful, original haiku art. Whether you are looking for artwork to display, graphics for a commercial designs, or professionally designed body art we have the design you need.

Art - Looking for art to hang in your home, office or dojo? We offer original hand-brushed art unframed on hand-made Japanese paper, framed and on beautiful Japanese scrolls. The original art is hand-brushed and signed by Master Japanese Calligrapher Eri Takase. These are original works of art created personally by Master Takase when your order is placed.

Graphics - If you are a graphic artist or business looking for a beautiful illustration to accentuate a marketing idea, illustrate a book or add flair to a website then we offer each design in several formats suitable for commercial use. These are all made immediately available when your order is placed. Simply select the appropriate resolution and when your order is placed you are given a link to the design.

Tattoo - Each design was created with an eye towards being a tattoo design. We offer not only a high-resolution of the design as it should appear on the skin, but also provide the line art that your tattoo artist will need to properly ink the design.

Below we have included just a few of the designs available in our catalog. For more designs, see our entire catalog at StockKanji.com - Japanese Haiku Designs.

Haiku is the Japanese poetic art of capturing a moment. Traditional Japanese Haiku are short 21 syllable poems in a 5-7-5 pattern. And for the Haiku poet this is enough to capture life's moments. These short poems, at the hand of a master poet, can truly touch us across the ages. The poem "A world of grief and pain. Flowers bloom, Even then ..." by Kobayashi Issa was written upon the death his child and it speaks to all that have experienced such tragedy. Japanese Haiku can be microscopic ... Haiku is about focusing on a moment.
 
"It is said of the three most famous Haiku poets that Basho is the poet, Issa the conscience, and Buson the artist. I find myself going to Basho to look for the poetic moment, to Issa to comment on what is important and for perspective, and it is to Buson I go to for the art that is always before us in everyday life."

Eri Takase

Basho - In the plum blossom scent, the sun pops out, a mountain path (ume ga ka ni notto hi no deru yamaji kana)

Haiku Calligraphy
by Eri Takase

Japanese Haiku Art - For personal and commercial use

This is a collection of classic poems written by master poets and rendered as visual art by Master Japanese Calligrapher Eri Takase. The actual designs can be ordered as Japanese Haiku Calligraphy Designs for Personal and Professional Use and can also be ordered as hand-brushed artwork by Master Takase as Custom Japanese Calligraphy Art and Custom Japanese Scrolls.

For personal use, such as for a tattoo or in a craft, the designs are delivered digitally in Adobe PDF format. These may not be edited but can easily be resized. For professional use, the commercial use format are subject to our licensing agreement and come in 72 dpi, 300 dpi and 600 dpi JPG. The higher resolutions are suitable for all print applications including magazine articles, advertising, book illustrations, and so on.

We also offer completely custom designs for commercial use. For non-exclusive custom design prices start at $135 and may be ordered at Custom Japanese Calligraphy for Limited Distribution. Or if you need exclusivity and/or want to copyright the calligraphy as part of a logo design (for example) then Custom Japanese Calligraphy for Exclusive Use starting at $350 would be appropriate.

If you have questions or suggestions please do not hesitate to contact us.

For help viewing the Japanese text see Displaying Japanese Characters

Haiku Design

Haiku Design Description

Basho - On the back of the mirror, A spring unseen, A flowering plum-tree (hito mo minu haru ya kagami no ura no ume)

(8 designs in catalog)

H3000 - Haiku by Basho - On the back of the mirror ...

On the back of the mirror,
A spring unseen,
A flowering plum-tree
hito mo minu
haru ya kagami no
ura no ume
人も見ぬ
春や鏡の
うらの梅
Basho bashou 芭蕉
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Custom Japanese Art from $135 Custom Japanese Scroll from $220

R. H. Blyth suggests the translation:

A spring unseen of men, -
On the back of the mirror,
A flowering plum-tree.  [10]

Nelson and Saito suggest the translation:

A spring no one sees -
On a mirror's back
Apricot Blossoms.  [5]

Buson - A flash of lightning, The sound of raindrops, Falling among the bamboo (inazuma ni koboruru ota ya take no tsuyu)

(6 designs in catalog)

H3001 - Haiku by Buson - A flash of lightning ...

A flash of lightning!
The sound of raindrops
Falling among the bamboo
inazuma ni
koboruru oto ya
take no tsuyu
稲妻に
こぼる々音や
竹の霧

Buson buson 蕪村
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Custom Japanese Art from $135 Custom Japanese Scroll from $220
Buson - In the spring rain, The pond and the river, Have become one (ike to kawa hitotsu ni narinu haru no ame)

(7 designs in catalog)

H3002 - Haiku by Buson - In the spring rain ...

In the spring rain
The pond and the river
Have become one.
 [11]
ike to kawa
hitotsu ni narinu
haru no ame
Buson buson 蕪村
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Basho - In the plum blossom scent, the sun pops out, a mountain path (ume ga ka ni notto hi no deru yamaji kana)

(8 designs in catalog)

H3003 - Haiku by Basho - In the plum blossom scent ...

In the plum blossom scent,
the sun pops out,
a mountain path
ume ga ka ni
notto hi no deru
yamaji kana
梅が香に
のっと日の出る
山路かな
Basho bashou 芭蕉
Personal Use Starting from $13.95 Commercial Use from $33.95
Custom Japanese Art from $135 Custom Japanese Scroll from $220

The modern use of the "small tsu" predates this poem. At the time the poem was written, the word and the context determined the pronunciation so today we write "のっと" (read notto)but the original poem wrote "のつと" (also read notto but written as notsuto). In the designs here we use the modern form.

R. H. Blyth suggests the translation:

Suddenly the sun rose,
To the scent of the plum-blossoms
Along the mountain path.  [6]

Daniel C. Buchanan suggests the translation:

On sweet plum blossoms
The sun rises suddenly.
Look, a mountain path! [32]

Buchanan writes, "The combination of the beauty and fragrance of plum blossoms lining the mountain path as the sun appears over the horizon, excites the wonder and admiration of the poet." [32]

Buson - The long slow days of spring, piling up, so far away the past (osoki hi no tsumorite tooki mukashi kana)

(6 designs in catalog)

Buson - The long slow days of spring, piling up, so far away the past (osoki hi no tsumorite tooki mukashi kana)

H3004 - Haiku by Buson - The long slow days of sprint ...

The long slow days of spring,
piling up,
so far away the past
osoki hi no
tsumorite tooki mukashi kana
遅き日の
つもりて遠き
昔かな
Buson buson 蕪村
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Custom Japanese Art from $135 Custom Japanese Scroll from $220

R. H. Blyth suggests the following translation:

Slow days passing, accumulating, -
How distant they are,
The things of the past. 

R. H. Blyth writes, "The sense of the passage of time, bound up with the feeling of the evanescence of things is inborn to the Japanese, but intensified by the Indian thought that remained in the Buddhism introduced to Japan." [21]

Buson - Plum blossoms everywhere, I should go south, I should go north (ume ochikochi minami subeku kita subeku)

(8 designs in catalog)

H3005 - Haiku by Buson - Plum-blossoms everywhere ...

Plum-blossoms everywhere,
I should go south,
I should go north.
ume ochikochi
minami subeku
kita subeku
Buson_04.gif (1153 bytes)
Buson buson 蕪村
Personal Use Starting from $13.95 Commercial Use from $33.95
Custom Japanese Art from $135 Custom Japanese Scroll from $220

R. H. Blyth suggests the following translation:

Plum-blossoms here and there,
It is good to go north.
Good to go south.  [8]

One also sees the pronunciation minnami which would make the second line seven syllables.

Buson - In the moonlight, the color and scent of the wisteria, seems so far away (tsuki ni tooku oboyuru fuji no iroka kana)

(8 designs in catalog)

H3006 - Haiku by Buson - In the moonlight ...

In the moonlight,
The color and scent of the wisteria
Seems far away.
tsuki ni tooku
oboyuru fuji no
iroka kana
月に遠く
おぼゆる藤の
色香かな
Buson buson 蕪村
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Custom Japanese Art from $135 Custom Japanese Scroll from $220
Basho - How admirable, to see lightning, and not think life is fleeting (inazuma ni satoranu hito no toutosa yo)

(8 designs in catalog)

H3007 - Haiku by Basho - How admirable ...

How admirable,
He who thinks not, "Life is fleeting,"
When he sees the lightning!
inazuma ni
satoranu hito no
tattosa yo
稲妻に
さとらぬ人の
貴さよ
Basho bashou 芭蕉
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Custom Japanese Art from $135 Custom Japanese Scroll from $220
Issa - A world of grief and pain, Flowers bloom, Even then (ku no shaba ya sakura ga sakeba saita tote)

(6 designs in catalog)

H3008 - Haiku by Issa - A world of grief and pain ...

A world of grief and pain,
Flowers bloom,
Even then.
ku no shaba ya
sakura ga sakeba
saita tote
苦の娑婆や
桜が咲けば
咲いたとて
Issa issa 一茶
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Custom Japanese Art from $135 Custom Japanese Scroll from $220

 


Partial Samples of H3008 Haiku by Issa
A world of grief and pain, flowers bloom, even then.

 

Haiku Design

Haiku Design Description

Basho - The old pond, a frog jumps in, the sound of water

(6 designs in catalog)

H3009 - Haiku by Basho - The old pond ...

The old pond;
A frog jumps in -
The sound of water
*
furu ike ya
kawazu tobikomu
mizu no oto
古池や
蛙飛込
水の音
Basho bashou 芭蕉
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Custom Japanese Art from $135 Custom Japanese Scroll from $220

* Translation by R. H. Blyth

See "Haiku by the Numbers, Seriously" by William J. Higginson. This is an amazing collection of translations of this one poem.

Also see Can the Spirit of Haiku be Translated? by Susumu Takiguchi

 

Issa - This dewdrop world, is a dewdrop world, and yet (tsuyu no yo wa tsuyu no yo nagara sari nagara)

(6 designs in catalog)

H3010 - Haiku by Issa - This dewdrop world ...

This dewdrop world,
is a dewdrop world,
and yet ...
[0]
tsuyu no yo wa
tsuyu no yo nagara
sari nagara
露の世は
露の世ながら
さりながら
Issa issa 一茶
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Custom Japanese Art from $135 Custom Japanese Scroll from $220

 

Nelson and Saito suggest the translation:

The world of dew is indeed
The fleeting world of dew -
And yet, and yet. [4]

This Dewdrop World ...
a dewdrop world it is, and still,
although it is ...

Henderson writes, "The first line is taken from the scripture comparing the evanescence of life in the world with that of dew. But Issa is not thinking in generalities; he is suffering from the loss of his child. ... A 'Dew-World' though it is, it is no world for dewdrops. They will not stay in it - and, much as he tries to, he can find no solace in the scripture."

An Introduction to Haiku page 131

Transactions of the Asiatic Society of Japan Vol. 1 1925 p. 123 article by Basil Hall Chamberlain

Granted this dewdrop world is but
A dewdrop worlds, - this granted, yet ...

Chamberlain explains the poem as "'Granted that all phenomenon are transitory and valueless, like the dew that forthwith dries up and vanishes, still, when all is said and done, we can not quite afford to throw lie and its joys away. There is some element of permanence in it yet, though it were hard to define this element precisely.' The words in the original are as pretty as the thought itself is graceful and true."

 

Basho - Taken ill on my travels, My dreams roam over the withered moors (tabi ni yande yume wa kareno wo kake meguru)



Basho - Taken ill on my travels, My dreams roam over the withered moors (tabi ni yande yume wa kareno wo kake meguru)


(5 designs in catalog)

H3011 - Haiku by Basho - Taken ill on my travels ...

Taken ill on my travels,
My dreams roam over
the withered moors.
*
tabi ni yande
yume wa kareno wo
kake meguru
旅に病んで
夢は枯野を
かけ廻る
Basho bashou 芭蕉
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Of this poem Basho wrote "This is not my death-verse, nor is it not my death-verse. At any rate it is a verse suggested by my illness. But to think of such a matter now that I face the great question of life and death, although it is an art to which I have devoted all my life - it may well be called a delusion." [1]

A week after writing this poem Basho would know the answer to the great question.
 

* This translation really is Miyamori's

I'm taken ill while travelling;
And my dreams roam o'er withered moors.

Taken ill on my travels,
My dreams roam over withered moors. [7]

R. H. Blyth suggests the translation:

Ill on a journey;
My dreams wander
Over a withered moor.  [6]

A year of Japanese epigrams p 89

Near my journey's end,
In dreams I trudge the wild, waste moor,
And seek a kindly friend.

"In this, his last verse, he pictures himself as still wandering on a solitary pilgramage, and, falling ill while crossing a desolate moor, he seeks the house of some charitable friend who will take him in". p 130

Porter, William N. A Year of Japanese Epigrams. London: Oxford University Press, 1911.

Issa - Lifting up the hatchet, To cut it down, It was budding (nata agete kiran to sureba konome kana)

(5 designs in catalog)

H3012 - Haiku by Shiki - Lifting up the hatchet ...

Lifting up the hatchet
To cut it down,
It was budding. [9]
nata agete
kiran to sureba
konome kana
鉈あげて
きらんとすれば
木の芽かな
Shiki shiki 子規
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Issa - In this world of ours, We walk above hell, Gazing at flowers (yo no naka wa jigoku no ue no hanami kana)


Issa - In this world of ours, We walk above hell, Gazing at flowers (yo no naka wa jigoku no ue no hanami kana)

(5 designs in catalog)

 

H3013 - Haiku by Issa - In this world ...

In this world,
We walk above hell,
Gazing at flowers.
[0]
yo no naka wa
jigoku no ue no
hanami kana
世の中は
地獄の上の
花見哉
Issa issa 一茶
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David G. Lanoue writes in his excellent website Haiku of Kobayashi Issa, "In it, Issa offers a striking juxtaposition: above, people enjoy a pleasant day of viewing spring blossoms--drinking sake, eating, joking, laughing; while deep below, poor souls suffer the torments of hell. The contrast suggests that, for Issa, the opposite of hell isn't heaven; it's being in this world on a day when the blossoms bloom." [2]

R. H. Blyth notes, "Happiness is impossible without forgetting." [3]

R. H. Blyth suggests the translation:

In this world of ours,
We walk on the roof of Hell,
Gazing at the flowers. [3]

David G. Lanoue suggests the translation:

in this world
over hell, viewing
spring blossoms [2]

Shiki - Three thousand, Haiku to examine, Two persimmons (sanzen no haiku wo kemishi kaki futatsu)


Shiki - Three thousand, Haiku to examine, Two persimmons (sanzen no haiku wo kemishi kaki futatsu)

(4 designs in catalog)

H3104 - Haiku by Shiki - Three Thousand Haiku ...

Three thousand
Haiku to examine
Two persimmons.
[0]
sanzen no
haiku wo kemishi
kaki futatsu
三千の
俳句を閲し
柿二つ
Shiki shiki 子規

R. H. Blyth suggests the translation:

Examining
Three thousand haiku:
Two persimmons.

R. H. Blyth writes, "In this verse then, Shiki has promised himself two persimmons when he has finished perusing what looks like about three thousand haiku. They are a kind of reward, which spurs him on to finish his labour. The feverish poet lies in bed poring over the verses of nincompoops and poetasters, and ever and anon glances at the two persimmons which wait there to be eaten or not." [15]

Writes Timothy L. Jackowski, Takase Studio translator, "This is the only art that I have at work. Eri created this for me as a gift - which makes it even more special. While I do love persimmons, in my case, my persimmon is a five mile run ... or ten. Each person is motivated differently - what gets you through the day? What is your persimmon?

Issa - The bitter part, eaten by the mother, mountain persimmon (shibui toko haha ga kui keri yama no kaki)

(5 designs in catalog)

H3105 - Haiku by Issa - The bitter part ...

The bitter part
eaten by the mother,
mountain persimmon.
[0]
shibui toko
haha ga kui keri
yama no kaki
澁いとこ
母が喰ひけり
山の柿
Issa issa 一茶

R. H. Blyth suggests the two translation:

Wild Persimmons,
The mother eating
The bitter parts. [16]

Mountain persimmons;
The mother is eating
The astringent parts.[19]

One end of the persimmon is sweet, the other bitter. The mother gives the sweet end to the child and herself consumes the astringent remains. The self-sacrifice of mothers.

This poem always reminds me of a story in Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin where a mother gave the entire chocolate bar, the rarest of treats, to her child. As always seems to happen, a little chocolate ended up on the child's face and she wiped it off with her finger ... and then took a small taste of the sweet for herself.

Buson - The spring sea, all day ebb and flow, ebb and flow (haru no umi hinemosu notari notari kana)

Buson - The spring sea, all day ebb and flow, ebb and flow (haru no umi hinemosu notari notari kana)

Buson - The spring sea, all day ebb and flow, ebb and flow (haru no umi hinemosu notari notari kana)

Buson - The spring sea, all day ebb and flow, ebb and flow (haru no umi hinemosu notari notari kana)

(4 designs in catalog)

H3016 - Haiku by Buson - The spring sea ...

The spring sea,
all day ebb and flow,
ebb and flow.
[0]
haru no umi
hinemosu notari
notari kana
春の海
ひねもすのたり
のたりかな
Buson buson 蕪村
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Daniel C. Buchanan suggests the translation:

The sea at springtime.
All day it rises and falls,
Yes, rises and falls. 

Daniel C. Buchanan writes, "The sea at spring, though generally undisturbed by storms, nonetheless moves continuously. So, too, in the life of a person or nation there are always ups and downs and a certain amount of monotony." [20]

Asataro Miyamori suggests the translation:

Behold! the spring sea undulates
And undulates the whole day long.

Miyamori goes on to write, "A delightful picture of the halcyon spring sea rises to the mind's eye at once. As far as the eye can travel, the ocean swells and sinks gently and regularly all day long. This original description of the peaceful spring sea, making use of an onomatopoeic adverb notari-notari, is highly successful. The chief merit of this verse consists in the extremely please rhythm of notari-notari which cannot adequately be represented in English." [22]

Mason and Caiger suggest the translation:

The spring sea -
All day long it rose and fell,
Rose and fell.
[23]

(4 designs in catalog)

H3017 Haiku by Basho - Not spilling the glistening dew ...

Not spilling the glistening dew,
the bush clover,
undulating
.
[0]
shiratsuyu wo
kobusanu hagi no
uneri kana
白露を
こぼさぬ萩の
うねりかな
Basho bashou 芭蕉
Personal Use Starting from $14.95 Commercial Use from $34.95
Custom Japanese Art from $135 Custom Japanese Scroll from $220

Asataro Miyamori suggests the translation:

The lespedeza flowers sway and sway,
But not enough to shake down their white dews.

Miyamori goes on to write, "The hagi or lespedeza is an autumn herb with graceful pliant stems and little lovely flowers, either red or white. A beautiful verse quite worthy of the graceful flower."  [24]



(9 designs in catalog)
Summer grass
all the warriors are
but the remains of a dream
[0]
natsukusa ya
tsuwamono domo ga
yume no ato
夏草や
兵どもが
夢の跡
Basho bashou 芭蕉

Summer grasses -
Remains of
Warrior's Dreams [33]
Summer grass
the only remains of soldiers'
dreams [34]


夏草
natsukusa - summer grass
tsuwamono - soldier
yume - dream(s)
ato - remains, ruins

This poem was written in the summer of 1689. Basho was looking out over a grass field that was the site of an ancient battle. After writing this poem, he sat down and wept.


A Note on the Japanese: Some haiku were written more than 300 years ago and Japanese has changed dramatically over that time. Most traditional Japanese haiku, such as those written by Basho, have been reworked to use modern Japanese - and this is what you see in almost all books; the number of syllables remains fixed, but the characters used and sometimes even the reading may have changed from the original.

Haiku are commonly written in kanji and hiragana today but hiragana was not standardized until 1900 and what preceded hiragana, called hentaigana is quite different and, for the most part, unreadable to all but experts in archaic Japanese. We attempt to document these differences and often talk about the changes in the language, though ultimately, Master Takase will select a correct form that also lends itself to an artistic rendering.


Haiku List - Order of Inclusion

H3018 Haiku by Ryota - They spoke no words, The visitor the host, And the white chrysanthemum. [0]
H3019 Haiku by Buson - From far and near, Hearing the sounds of waterfalls, Young leaves. [0]
H3020 Haiku by Chiyojo - To the person breaking off the branch, Giving its fragrance, The plum blossom. [0]
H3021 Haiku by Shiko - How enviable, Turning beautiful then falling, Maple leaves. [0]
H3022 Haiku by Basho - Shake even the grave! My wailing is the autumn wind. [0]
H3023 Haiku by Shiki - A pear tree is blooming. By a collapsed house on an old battlefield. [0]
H3024 Haiku by Issa - Were my father here, At dawn we would gaze, Over the green fields. (Translation by Blyth)
H3025 Haiku by Buson - An evening orchid, Hidden in its scent, The flower's whiteness. [0]
H3026 Haiku by Buson
- To white plum blossoms, Each night just dawning, Evermore. [0]
H3027 Haiku by Chiyojo - My little dragonfly hunter. I wonder where he is off to today. [0]
H3028 Haiku by Issa - Snail, ever so slowly climb, Mt. Fuji! [0]

Haiku Translations in Progress - This is our bull pen of designs we are thinking about doing ...

Haiku List - Alphabetical by Poet

Basho - furu ike ya kawazu tobikomu mizu no oto
Basho - hito mo minu haru ya kagami no ura no ume
Basho - inazuma ni satoranu hito no tattosa yo
Basho - natsukusa ya tsuwamono domo ga yume no ato
Basho - shiratsuyu wo kobusanu hagi no uneri kana
Basho - tabi ni yande yume wa kareno wo kake meguru
Basho - tsuka mo ugoke waga naku koe wa aki no kaze
Basho - ume ga ka ni notto hi no deru yamaji kana
Buson - haru no umi hinemosu notari notari kana
Buson - ike to kawa hitotsu ni narinu haru no ame
Buson - inazuma ni koboruru ota ya take no tsuyu
Buson - ochikochi ni taki no oto kiku wakaba kana
Buson - osoki hi no tsumorite tooki mukashi kana
Buson - shiraume ni akuru yo bakari to nari ni keri
Buson - tsuki ni tooku oboyuru fuji no iroka kana
Buson - ume ochikochi minami subeku kita subeku
Buson - yoru no ran ka ni kakurete ya hana shiroshi
Chiyojo - taoraruru hito ni kaoru ya ume no hana
Chiyojo - tombo tsuri kyou wa doko made itta yara
Issa - chichi arite akebono mitashi aotabara
Issa - katatsuburi sorosoro nobore fuji no yama
Issa - ku no shaba ya sakura ga sakeba saita tote
Issa - shibui toko haha ga kui keri yama no kaki
Issa - tsuyu no yo wa tsuyu no yo nagara sari nagara
Issa - yo no naka wa jigoku no ue no hanami kana
Ryota - mono iwazu kyaku to teishu to shiragiku to
Shiki - nashi saku ya ikusa no ato no kuzure ie
Shiki - nata agete kiran to sureba konome kana
Shiki - sanzen no haiku wo kemishi kaki futatsu
Shiko - urayamashi utsukushuu natte chiru momiji

 

 


References:

[0] Translation by Timothy L. Jackowski, Takase Studios, LLC

[1] Miyamori, Asataro (1932). An Anthology of Haiku Ancient and Modern. Tokyo: Maruzen Company, Ltd. 60-61.

[2] Lanoue, David G (1991-2009). Haiku of Kobayashi Issa

[3] Blyth, R. H. (1963) A History of Haiku Volume One. Tokyo. The Hokuseido Press. 367.

[4] Nelson, William. Saito, Takafumi (2006) 1020 Haiku in Translation: The Heart of Basho, Buson and Issa. South Carolina. BookSurge Publishing. 197.

[5] Nelson. 1020 Haiku in Translation. 19.

[6] Blyth. A History of Haiku Volume One. 107.

[7] Miyamori. An Anthology of Haiku Ancient and Modern. 218.

[8] Blyth, R. H. (1982) Haiku, Volume Four: Autumn-Winter. Tokyo. The Hokuseido Press. 984.
[9] Blyth. Haiku, Volume Four. 985.
[10] Blyth. Haiku, Volume Four. 992.
[11] Blyth. Haiku, Volume Four. 992.
[12] Blyth. Haiku, Volume Four. 1001.
[13] Blyth. Haiku, Volume Four. 1101.
[14] Blyth. Haiku, Volume Four. 1103.
[15] Blyth. Haiku, Volume Four. 1110.
[16] Blyth. Haiku, Volume Four. 1111.
[17] Blyth. Haiku, Volume Four. 1120.
[18] Blyth. Haiku, Volume Four. 1129.

[19] Blyth, R. H. (1981) Haiku, Volume One: Easter Culture. Tokyo, The Hokuseido Press. 231.

[20] Buchanan, Daniel C. (1973) One Hundred Famous Haiku. Tokyo, Kenkyusha Printing Co. 23.

[21] Blyth, R. H. (1982) Haiku, Volume Four: Autumn-Winter. Tokyo. The Hokuseido Press. 984.

[22] Miyamori. An Anthology of Haiku Ancient and Modern. 460.

[23] Mason, R. H. P. Caiger, J. G. (1997) A History of Japan: Revised Edition. Tokyo, Tuttle Publishing. 238.

[24] Miyamori. An Anthology of Haiku Ancient and Modern. 209.

[25] Miyamori. An Anthology of Haiku Ancient and Modern. 502.

[26] Byth. A History of Haiku Volume One. 245.

[27] Miyamori. An Anthology of Haiku Ancient and Modern. 496.

[28] Blyth. A History of Haiku Volume One. 218.

[29] Donegan, Patricia. Ishibashi, Yoshie. (1998) Chiyo-ni: Woman Haiku Master. Singapore. Tuttle Publishing. 26.

[30] Miyamori. An Anthology of Haiku Ancient and Modern. 431.

[31] Donegan. Chiyo-ni: Woman Haiku Master. 108.

[32] Buchanan, Daniel C. (1973) One Hundred Famous Haiku. Tokyo, Kenkyusha Printing Co. 13.

[33] Nelson. 1020 Haiku in Translation. 80.

[34] Jane Reichhold. Basho - The Complete Haiku. Tokyo, Kondansha International Ltd. 137.

Gill, Robin D. (2006) Cherry Blossom Epiphany. Paraverse Press.

Related Sites:

Haiku of Kobayashi Issa - An archive of over 9000 Kobayashi Issa haiku and translations and insightful commentaries.

Jeffrey's Japanese <-> English Dictionary - This is an independent dictionary based on the Edict data maintained by Dr. Jim Breen of Monash University.

Haiku Source - A Selected Collection of Japanese Haiku - Includes a few English translations

Wikipedia - Haiku - Overview of Haiku including brief biographies of Japan's most influential poets

Moonset Literary Newspaper - Dedicated to the Poetic and Visual Studies of Japanese Art Forms


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